Category Archives: Brit Pop

Reminder to Breathe

Finals are over!! It’s finally summer!! I should not be as stressed out as I am right now!! Regardless, it was super convenient that I took entertainment reporting and writing with the one and only Holly Gleason this semester, so I have a record review written for you already — and bonus: it’s been graded.

Album: Lungs
Artist: Florence + The Machine

Lungs

Atmospheric might be one adjective you could use to describe Florence + The Machine’s debut; forceful, another. Frontwoman Florence Welch shows her fantastical side on Lungs, and she has enough talent to make it worth listening to. Her fantasy worlds create floating sensations, but her voice keeps listeners grounded as she sings about death, violence, and lonliness.

Though other female artists of her caliber prefer heavier sounds — Amy likes horns, Adele is partial to piano — Welch prefers harps, chimes and bells. The airiness found on Lungs could easily pull listeners out to a darker version of Neverland with Peter Pan, but use of heavy drums and Florence’s pipes keeps her audience on the ground wishing instead.

Lofty though the album may be, Welch’s lyrics tend to tell twisted stories. The Jack-White-esque single “Kiss With A Fist” is a stand out sonically, but it sets the lyrical tone. It seems easygoing enough, but lines like “A kick in the teeth is good for some, but a kiss with a fist is better than none,” make light of a tumultuous relationship as an angry Florence sings about mutual domestic violence.

The morose “Girl With One Eye” is an even better example. The track, the majority of which is comprised with a lone, echoing electric, deep drums and cymbal work, hovers above listeners as Welch slurs about cutting out some bitch’s eye for pissing her off.

Musically lighter tracks like “I’m Not Calling You A Liar” provide the perfect gust of wind to sustain wishful flight, though. Sleigh bells accompany light piano to open the track, and a harp joins in at the chorus to complete the atmospheric feel. In “My Boy Builds Coffins,” Welch crafts a dark story that brings listeners to a faraway fantasy world, while the band’s use of rolling guitar riffs, light harp runs and airy cymbal work creates the scenery.

Welch’s stories wouldn’t be so captivating if not for her voice, but that’s something Welch knows. The effect found on Lungs isn’t something many bands can craft successfully, but Florence + The Machine play to their strengths to create a strong debut.

Honorable Mentions: Dog Days Are Over, Howl, My Boy Builds Coffins, Hurricane Drunk

“The Wonderwall Album”

Happy Almost February! I hope you’re not stressed out to your eyeballs like I am! I made a New Years’ resolution to post once every 2 weeks at least. I’m pretty sure this doesn’t hold to that, but at least this is #2 for January, right?

I’ve got a good one for this week. It was supposed to be my last post but I scrapped it for TLSP and rewrote it anew for today.

Album: (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?
Artist: Oasis

Oasis_-_(What's_The_Story)_Morning_Glory_album_cover

Why am I writing about Oasis? Good question. I guess I like a challenge. But what can you say about Oasis that hasn’t already been said? Nothing, if we’re being honest.

But I like to think of myself as a one stop shop for album information, so maybe if you’re reading you’ll learn something you didn’t know already.

Oasis was obviously a staple of the 90s. They’re one of those bands that makes me cry every time. Their albums have been hailed as record-breakers, they’ve made it on too many “greatest” lists to count, and they were one of the greatest acts in Britpop ever. They were big from the beginning — they formed in 1991, and their debut album, Definitely Maybe, was the fastest selling debut album in the UK at the time of its release.

Now, a little history about the band’s members: The band was initially formed by Liam Gallagher as “The Rain,” but eventually they invited his older brother Noel to join. Noel came on as lead guitarist with the agreement that he would do all of the writing for the band. Both brothers were big partiers and they had quite the reputation for their sibling rivalry, and one brother or the other was constantly leaving the band for some reason or another. The band swapped several drummers over the years, but more people were concerned with the fights Liam and Noel would get into.

Oasis also had a reputation in the media for their rivalry with Damon Albarn’s band Blur (see also the Gorillaz), since both bands were heading the Britpop movement. From what I understand, Noel and Albarn have put aside their differences since the 90s.

Eventually, the band broke up in 2009. Liam went on to form Beadey Eye and Noel went on to form Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds (who happen to be playing at the Ryman on my birthday, hint hint Mom and Dad).

Also, for the purposes of discussing Oasis’ music, I feel like I should mention that Noel Gallagher and Oasis have successfully been sued at least once for plagiarism.

But on to what you guys really want to hear about, right? The Wonderwall Album.

Just kidding. It’s called (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? and it’s awesome. It was released in October of 1995 (I mean, how 90s can you get?) on Creation Records and it sold over 300,000 copies in it’s first week. In fact, as of 2014, it was rank as the fifth best-selling album in the UK, and at the time, it was the third fastest-selling album in the UK. It peaked at #4 on the Billboard 200 and made it in the top 10 all over the world. Now that’s just impressive. Rolling Stone even included it on their 100 Best Albums of the 90s and their 500 Greatest Albums of All Time lists.

The album included many of the band’s most well-known singles, including “Wonderwall,” “Don’t Look Back In Anger,” “Some Might Say,” and “Champagne Supernova.” I’d argue those are the only four Oasis songs a lot of people know. They aren’t the best on the album though — not to say they aren’t good, because they are.

I really find the material on WTSMG? fascinating. I can’t help but feel incredibly nostalgic every time I listen to it. Maybe it’s Noel’s lyrics — “Where were you while we were getting high?” — but there’s something about them that always captures your attention. Of course, Noel himself says most of the lyrics on the album were gibberish, but Liam disagrees. Even if they don’t mean anything to Noel, they still mean something — but let’s be honest, no one’s really sure what that meaning might be.

Regardless, his writing style mimics that of John Lennon better than anyone I’ve ever seen (and that might be because he’s ripped off a few of his lines here and there, but I digress). Lines like “Slowly walking down the hall/faster than a cannonball,” found in “Champagne Supernova” are exactly what I’m talking about. And he’s so consistent. “Don’t Look Back In Anger,” undoubtedly a tribute to John Lennon’s “Imagine” (it opens with the same piano chords, after all) does it best with lines like “So I’ll start a revolution from my bed/Cause you said the brains I had went to my head.” I’m pretty sure Noel got that one from Lennon himself, actually.

As AllMusic’s Stephen Thomas Erlewine put it: “This is where his genius lies: He’s a thief and doesn’t have many original thoughts, but as a pop/rock melodicist he’s pretty much without peer.”

And he’s right. Noel might not always be completely original, but he’s easily one of the best songwriters of his generation. He brings the best from the artists he idolizes and mixes them together to create a movement. His soaring melodies and clever lyrics combine to give the album so much variance, and it all culminates into these feelings you’re left with as a listener as image after image is painted for you with words. There’s a ring of sadness to a lot of the material that I know I’m not imagining.

It definitely means something.

And while I generally think Noel Gallagher was the better vocalist (who doesn’t love the chorus in “Don’t Look Back In Anger”?), I’ll be upfront and say that without Liam’s vocals this album wouldn’t be the same. He’s forceful when he needs to be, cheeky when it’s called for, and his voice adds to the nostalgia I feel every time I listen. He brings something different to the words than I think Noel would — and that’s the beauty of it.

Oasis had a tumultuous run, but I think that’s why they rock with the best of them. Liam and Noel both have a lot of passion for the music and they both poured their hearts and souls into it. And I think that’s the reason for the nostalgia — their feelings take hold of yours. And that’s the genius found in (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?

 

What are your thoughts on (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? Love it? Hate it? Comment here, Facebook or Twitter! Until next time, keep listening.

Honorable Mentions: “Cast No Shadow,” “Some Might Say,” “She’s Electric,” “Morning Glory”

Information pulled from Oasis’s band page, AllMusic.com, and Billboard.com

Me & Ms. Winehouse

Alright. It’s been a pretty crazy week, but I’ve got a good one for you this week so I’m gonna cut straight to the chase.

Album: Back To Black                                                                      Artist: Amy Winehouse

Album cover featured on the American release
Album cover featured on the American release

I would like to preface this album with a few things first. I think this might be the first female artist I’ve written about (someone check me on that???) and I’m not sure why because I’m actually quite the feminist. Second, I don’t think I can say anything about Amy Winehouse that hasn’t been said before. Not only was she an amazing artist, but the media decided to turn the poor girl into everyone’s entertainment source and I don’t think that’s what she deserved. I feel like I’m contributing to that a little, however, a movie titled Amy was just released, and in the spirit of honoring her voice I’ve decided to hopefully at least introduce some of you to the amazing girl behind the media sideshow.

I would also like to note that the album I’m writing about is the American release, and instead of including “Addicted” as the eleventh track, a remix of “You Know I’m No Good” was included and I will not be including either in my review.

So where should I even begin? I think everyone knows Amy Winehouse because of her hit song “Rehab,” but she was actually popular in the UK before that song even got to America. She only released two albums before her death of alcohol poisoning on July 23, 2011, but she is widely regarded as one of the most amazing female artists of her generation. Her death procured a lot of interest in the ever so famous 27 Club (if you don’t know what it is, click the link to find out) and she became even more famous posthumously. During her fame, her struggles with drug addiction and alcoholism, her on again off again relationship with her husband, and her frequent outbursts in public were under constant scrutiny by the media and she struggled with both her fame and her body image, as well as bipolar. I guess in some way, her experiences only prove that sometimes the most talented people are the ones that struggle the most.

And talented she was. Amy Winehouse is listed as number 26 on VH1’s Greatest Women in Music, she won countless Grammy awards, and the album I’m about to tell you about is rated number twenty on Rolling Stone’s 100 Best Albums of the 2000s and number 451 on their 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

Back To Black was released in the United States in March of 2007. The album had 5 singles: “Rehab,” which was arguably the most famous at least in the States, “You Know I’m No Good,” “Back to Black,” “Love Is A Losing Game,” and “Tears Dry On Their Own.” This album was heavily influenced by the girl groups of the 50s and 60s, and Winehouse would often list several artists from this era as her inspirations. She grew up with a lot of jazz and blues, and she captures it pretty perfectly in her music. The album was produced by Salaam Remi (who had produced her previous album) and most notably Mark Ronson. I don’t think he was lying when he referred to her as his musical soulmate. The two did fabulous work together, combining old sounds with contemporary ones to create a sound that was all Winehouse’s own.

Back To Black, while still bluesy, is less of a jazz album, however. This album was a departure from her first album, Frank, in that is was both more forceful and had heavier blues and R&B influences. I think this album is much darker in both content and sound and I think that’s what I like about it.  The album was recorded with the Dap-Kings, a group that specializes in soul and R&B reminiscent of the 60s, which complements Amy’s voice perfectly.

But we all know that it wasn’t just Amy’s sound that was so distinct. Even though she sounds like something straight out of an old time music club, her lyrics aren’t as innocent as she sounds. Winehouse made no attempt at being indirect. Lyrics like “What kind of f***ery is this?” found in “Me & Mr. Jones (the song was originally supposed to be titled “F***ery”) and “He left no time to regret/Kept his d*** wet/With his same old safe bet,” found in “Back To Black” demonstrate that perfectly. But she’s not profane just to be profane. I think there’s a fine line between unnecessary profanity and the kind of profanity that carries a meaning that can’t be captured otherwise. Winehouse was characteristically aggressive, but she was also a poet. Her lyrics would be amazing without her voice, but when she sings lines like “Memories mar my mind,” found in “Love Is A Losing Game,” it’s like she’s putting a spell on you.

Her vocals range from the ever so sweet “Just Friends” and “Love Is A Loosing Game” to the forceful and determined “Rehab” and “You Know I’m No Good.” The control she has over her voice is also notable — there aren’t a lot of artists that can manipulate their vocals the way she can. And of course, the album wouldn’t be complete without “Tears Dry On Their Own,” a self-power anthem set to the chords of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” Critic after critic praises her wit and her ability to be simultaneously classy and absolutely profane. She’s also praised for her tributes to her influences, as she manages to both incorporate but not copy them in her own style (see the Pitchfork article below).

And now I’ve written 900 words on the subject. Honestly, I feel the same about this album as I do few others. There just aren’t enough words. I can’t completely tell you via this blog post how amazing this album is, or just how beautiful her vocals are, or just how tortured her soul was, and I can’t tell you how amazing her lyrics are. That is for you to discover. Every song on this album is good.

So there you have it. If you listen to any one album on this blog, listen to this one (which I’ll probably say again, let’s be honest). You won’t regret it. I like to think that she and the rest of the 27 Club are up there still writing great music, which I know is kinda stupid, but it makes me feel better. Go listen to Amy Winehouse, and until next time, keep listening.

Honorable Song Mentions: You Know I’m No Good, Back To Black, Tears Dry On Their Own, He Can Only Hold Her (my personal favorite on the album)

Joshua Klein’s Back To Black review

Who Covered Who?

So it took me awhile to update this one and here is why. I originally wrote about Glass Animals and had the post like 80% done but then I completely changed my mind and I haven’t had time to write the new one. Instead of writing about an album this time, I’m writing about my top 5 favorite covers. Glass Animals is soon to come, and I’m kind of thinking of posting about Catfish again because good god were they amazing. Anyways, on to the music.

All Along the Watchtower
Cover Artist: Dave Matthews Band
Original Artist: God Only Knows (Kidding, it’s Bob Dylan)

I remember one time I had a conversation with my best friends mom about Dave Matthews Band, and I remember her asking, “Do you know what drives me crazy about Dave Matthews Band?” I asked her what, and she told me that they cover “All Along the Watchtower” like it’s their own song. I guess some people are entitled to that opinion. I full-heartedly disagree, however.

I like this version because it throws in a little Hendrix, it throws in a little Dylan, and it mixes it all up with DMB. Over the years it’s become an up to twelve minute spectacle that builds into the best jam ever. And I really mean that. “Watchtower” as us DMB fans call it is possibly one of my favorite things to watch the band play. Hell, even Bob Dylan himself likes DMB’s version.

The Man Who Sold The World
Cover Artist: Nirvana
Original Artist: David Bowie

I’m just gonna get this out of the way, cause it’s something I’ll get a lot of hate for: I am all for David Bowie. Really I am. But Bowie’s version of this song is just weird.

“The Man Who Sold The World” is another one of those songs that is pretty famous for how many people have covered it. The song itself has a bit of an ambiguous meaning, but the lyrics are sort of about someone’s multiple personalities and finding oneself. It’s kind of a horror twist on a coming of age kind of deal. The reason I like Nirvana’s version better is because of what Kurt Cobain brings to it, and honestly the content is probably why the song was important enough to him to even bother covering it. Seriously, listen. It’ll put you in a dark mood though — don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Do I Wanna Know?
Cover Artist: MS MR
Original Artist: Arctic Monkeys

I love the Arctic Monkeys. I love MS MR (post about them to come soon). And I love this song. So naturally I love that MS MR covered this song, and I’m extremely jealous of Alexandra cause she got to see it live and I have to rely on YouTube. Oh well.

Why do I like this cover? Well besides the fact that it’s almost impossible to not have a major girl crush on Lizzy Plapinger, the duo manages to take the song, smooth it out, add a few things, stir in a little funk, and it still keeps to the original. Despite the fact that they’ve put their own spin on it, it’s got the same emotion with a slightly different tone. Basically, this is a perfect example of how covers should be done.

We Can’t Stop
Cover Artist: Bastille
Original Artist: Miley Cyrus

I know, Miley. Gross. Really can’t stand her (though she doesn’t irk me as much as she used to, surprisingly). Hot damn Bastille turned this song to gold though. I’m not even kidding when I say you can actually take this song somewhat seriously.

The cover starts with a sick bass, includes some great piano, a violin, a tad bit of guitar work, need I say more? And despite the overall serious tone Bastille brings to the song, Dan Smith makes fun of the cover a little by adding the line “only Dad can judge us” (instead of “only God judge us), and throwing a little bit of “Achy Breaky Heart” in just for kicks and grins. Because I’m posting this, you guys had better watch to the end because it’s hilarious.

Hold On We’re Going Home
Cover Artist: Arctic Monkeys
Original Artist: Drake

This totally makes the list because, despite the fact that I don’t really listen to or even like Drake, I’ve heard this song a million times and the Arctic Monkeys completely transform it. They take the song and give it a totally different vibe. It sounds like something that should be in a Target commercial and I mean that in a fantastic way (not even a hint of sarcasm, even though it totally sounds like it). They turn it into a funky almost dance number that sounds like it should’ve come out of another era, and Turner’s voice is completely magical as he serenades you with Drake’s words. I think this is my favorite version of this song. So you should listen.

I highly recommend listening to all of these. Until next time, keep listening!

Catfishing

Look at that. A post that was promised and it’s even on time. Please, hold the applause.

Album: The Balcony                                                      Artist: Catfish and the Bottlemen

Catfish

Honestly, I don’t know that much about this band. They’re from Whales, which is pretty cool. I don’t know about that many bands from Whales. I do know that they’re fairly new on the scene having just come together in 2010. According to their Wikipedia page, they started off playing covers of The Beatles (which earns them mad respect points) and eventually moved on to writing their own stuff. Originally they just played “opening” gigs in parking lots before other artists’ shows. Soon enough they got their record deal in 2013 and emerged fast by playing the festival route the following year. In September of 2014 they dropped their debut, The Balcony. That was in the UK. Don’t ask me when the good ol’ U.S. of A got it cause I can’t tell you.

So before I say anything about the band or the album, I want to point out that frontman Van McCann (not his real name, but I wish it was) claims his inspiration comes from The Strokes and Oasis. What does this tell us? 1) he has really good taste in music and 2) he’s fond of 90s music. He might be my favorite person already. And might I just say, Catfish nails it.

Now Ben Homewood of NME called Catfish’s sound “about nine years too late.” He said it (or, wrote it rather) pretty negatively. His review called The Balcony “ham-fisted” (whatever that means) and goes on to slam McCann’s lyrics and the band’s overall sound.

My opinion? Homewood just doesn’t appreciate what Catfish is bringing to the table. Or maybe I’m just sentimental. This album is about nine years too late, and I can give him that. But it’s honestly something that needs to be here and now.

So what is their overall sound? Well if Oasis and The Strokes had a baby that grew up to become a rebellious indie teenager under the influence of The Arctic Monkeys, it would be Catfish and the Bottlemen. So let’s talk about that for a second.

First of all, I have mad respect for the band. They said they wanted to sound like The Strokes and Oasis and they do (if not a little lighter on the Oasis side). Not many really pull that off. So maybe that’s a good thing, and maybe that’s a bad thing. Maybe they aren’t original enough. Maybe they know exactly who they want to be as musicians. It could go either way. Regardless, they bring the “indie” sound to an old favorite.

Now The Balcony had it’s fair share of singles. Usually I hate people who only know/talk about the singles, but I’m gonna be that person for a second. I feel like CATB definitely picked their strongest songs to release, and it did them a world of good. “Pacifier” opens up with a distorted guitar riff that’s just screechy enough to hear a definite melody. It’s fast paced and heavy on the drums, and McCann’s actually quite the vocalist. There’s something to say about artists who aren’t afraid to roughen their voice. It’s quite honestly 90s-tastic. And if The Strokes’ influence wasn’t apparent enough in that track, there’s always the ever so pop-rock “Kathleen.”

As far as lyrics, I can admit that McCann has some work to do. He wrote most of The Balcony’s tracks when he was just fifteen and sixteen, so yeah. Some of them are the work of a teenage boy. But some of them hold insight that most sixteen year old boys don’t have. For example, in “Pacifier,” McCann mourns a lack of understanding with a lover as he cries “You just don’t know how it feels to lose/something you never had and never will,” which is a concept I think most people don’t often think about.

The Balcony received mixed reviews. Most critics put it somewhere in the high-middle. Some loved it. Some (like Mr. Homewood) hated it. Regardless of what other critics think though, I liked the album. It’s got something that I think a lot of younger people missed out on in the late 90s and early 2000s — something that I think they shouldn’t have missed out on, and something I was very fortunate to be very exposed to (thanks Lindsay & Erin!). Catfish is merely reviving their opportunity.

Personally, I think they’re a band who know exactly who they want to be. I like what they’ve got and they can only grow from here. I’m very excited to see where they take their sudden fame. And I’m also very excited to see them next month.

Until next week (or whenever the hell it is I post these days), keep listening 🙂

70s? Try 80s.

Wow. Long time no see, or rather read. Or write. Whatever it is. I know I promised The 1975 last week. I also know I went AWOL. You see, there’s a story behind that. Once upon a time, a girl started her first semester in college, and one of her professors assigned three things that she had all semester to do. So naturally, she waited until the day before they were due to start/finish them. That day was last Wednesday. In my defense, one of them was about The 1975 concert, so I kinda wrote my blog without actually writing my blog.

I also know that I promised some other music for this week. It will be coming Saturday. I’m setting big goals for myself. After crushing my finals in a frenzy of stress, caffeine, and last-minute-study regrets that involved very little sleep, I’m ready to return to the blogosphere with a new and improved vigor. Ha. Just kidding. I’m still waiting until the last minute to write these. Onto the music:

Album: The 1975                                                                            Artist: The 1975

The 1975

Almost every review I’ve read (and granted — it was only two that I read start to finish) began with a touching story of a band called something or other that was just about to make it before they fell off the face of the earth. That band was The 1975. I’ll give you the shortened version: The 1975 has gone through like a million and a half band names. Their latest (before The 1975, obviously) was just about to make it with their EP single “Sex,” and then they suddenly disappeared and the accompanying video was removed from the internet. Later, they reappeared as The 1975 and released a few EPs before finally releasing their debut album, The 1975, in September of 2013.

There — now you’re caught up. The 1975 was a pretty ambitious debut. Most bands don’t start with 16 songs on their first album. Of course, several of these songs were released on a few EPs before the album, but they were all revamped during the recording of the album. Now, in my opinion, this is one of those bands that you’ll either fall in love with, or blow off after one listen. To be honest, I was almost in the latter category, but Alexandra’s a little obsessed and thanks to the song “The City” I didn’t blow them off. Not to say that I didn’t think they were good, but they were just… unexpected.

Unexpected sounds like a bad word. It’s got a negative connotation. I guess what I meant is that I expected them to be darker, for lack of a better word. They film a lot of their videos in black in white. A lot of their pictures are in black and white. They wear leather jackets and have cool haircuts. Brit pop was literally the last thing I was expecting. But seriously, it’s like Duran Duran meets The Arctic Monkeys but Matty Healy’s accent is like Alex Turner’s on crack and the 80s sound is that of Boy George. Ok, maybe not that bad. But back to the accent — I actually had to google some lyrics for once, and it was an odd experience because let me tell you: the lyrics I made up did NOT match the ones on the page.

But before I talk about the actual music I want to talk about what other critics had to say. Some critics loved it. In fact, Ryan Gardner of absolutepunk.net called the album “timeless already” and gave it a 9.5. I mean, I liked it. But a 9.5? That leaves no room for improvement! On the other end, some hated it. Caryn Ganz of Rolling Stone gave it 2/5 five stars and said that “The 1975 could use some enunciation lessons and an editor.” Harsh, really. I guess it’s not as bad as 1/5, though. (Links to reviews are at the bottom of the post).

I guess if you were to ask me, I’d fall somewhere in the middle but on the more positive end. I think I’ll go with a 7. Here’s why:

I’ll start with the good things about The 1975. For one, the band was incredibly ambitious and I think it definitely payed off. I think the album manages to keep it’s audiences attention despite the length, because their straight up 80s beats are incredibly catchy and make you want to dance in odd ways and Matty’s voice is wonderful. Yeah that’s right. I’m going to fangirl a little and call him Matty.

Secondly, I think Healy’s writing is pretty clever. Admittedly I can’t say it about all of the lyrics found on The 1975, but I would go with about 80%. The lyrical content mostly focuses on sex, drugs, and depression, but The 1975 knows exactly who they are. In “So Far (It’s Alright)” Healy sings “You just write about sex and killing yourself and how you hardly ever went to school.” I think it’s exactly what the band is going for though. A lot of their songs came out of their formative years and they’re very honest about where they came from and what they were doing back then.

I also think that the band is at it’s strongest when it goes for the more upbeat. Don’t get me wrong here, I love “Robbers” and other slower songs on the album. They’ve got a lot of emotion that I think is lacking from most music you hear today, but tracks like “Chocolate,” “Girls,” “Heart Out,” and “Sex” (among a million others I could keep naming) are where they seem the most comfortable.

But for as catchy and wonderful as this album is, there are some cons. Like I mentioned earlier, I think we can expect more from this band. The overall sound of the album doesn’t change much. For the longest time, in my head I would merge “Heart Out” and “Settle Down” in my head and realizing they weren’t in the same song was one of those earth-shattering moments. And that’s my point I guess — they all kind of run together (with a few exceptions of course). I also think that Healy has room to grow as a song writer, not that he isn’t doing a great job already. I admire their ambition and I’m excited to hear what comes next.

Until Saturday, keep listening peeps. Sorry I’ve been gone for so long 🙂

Honorable Song Mentions: It’s all good. I guess if I had to pick some, I’d go with The City, Sex, Girls, She Way Out, and Robbers (but only AFTER you’ve seen the music video — it’s sad).

Reviews: