Wasting Light, But Not Time

Well then. It’s certainly been awhile, hasn’t it? I’ve been planning this update for almost over a month, but between work and moving and school and life — let’s just say writing hasn’t been my priority. Sometimes I really just want to put it off, even though I always have a good time actually doing it. I’d also like to point out that it’s very hard to write when you’re listening to music that doesn’t inspire you.

Oh well. I’m back, and I’m bringing rock n’ roll with me.

Album: Wasting Light                                                       Artist: The Foo Fighters

Wasting Light

I talk about Dave Grohl and what a badass he is all the time, but ironically I don’t think I’ve ever written about a Foo album which is really quite a shame. I mean, the Foos really are a staple of the 90s, and with a rock god like Grohl fronting the group they really just can’t be ignored.

Now, who are The Foo Fighters? Long story short, Dave Grohl (formerly known as the drummer from Nirvana) set out to start a band that he would front after Nirvana and everyone was excited and some people were angry and all in all it turned out to be awesome. I don’t really want to go into the band’s history too much because I think most people are somewhat familiar with them (I mean they sold out Wembly, for pete’s sake). If you aren’t, I suggest looking up “Everlong” and “My Hero” and then maybe you’ll realize that you have heard of this band.

And since that’s out of the way, let’s talk about the album — or more specifically, why I’m writing about this one today. Wasting Light was The Foo’s seventh studio album and it was released in April of 2011 by RCA Records. So you might be asking at this point, “Gee Maddie, why would you write about the seventh album first?”

Well let me tell you what makes this album awesome.

There are a lot of things that make Wasting Light as amazing as it is, but to me I think The Foos did something so incredibly cool when they made this album: it was recorded analog. In Dave Grohl’s garage. At his house. With his kids running around (or so I imagine). So what does that mean exactly? Well I’m sure most of you know, but I’m gonna tell you anyway. The Foo Fighters went old school on this one. Not a single computer was used to make this album. That means what you hear is exactly what the band recorded. Every imperfection was captured as they rocked out in Grohl’s garage. There was no computer to cut and paste, or to edit, or to smooth out. This is how it was supposed to be done. It’s raw and it’s beautiful.

But there are other amazing things about this album. Not only was it recorded analog in a garage, but Wasting Light was also produced by Butch Vig who had previously worked with Grohl during the Nirvana days on Nevermind. Pat Smear also rejoined the band officially for the first time since The Colour and the Shape. With his addition, Wasting Light is a shredder with three guitars. I know that sounds like much, but the layers and the chords are so well done that the album just rocks, exactly like it’s supposed to.

Overall, Wasting Light is about more than just rock n’ roll. It’s about reflections on the past and hopes for the future and it’s about returning to where they came from. Krist Novoselic, the previous bassist for Nirvana) even guested on “I Should Have Known,” a track that makes a few unmistakable references to the late Kurt Cobain. Bob Mould from Hüsker Dü also made a guest appearance on the album, as well as many others.

I think what makes this one of the best Foo albums since the 90s is that you can really tell the band is proud of it. Dave Grohl himself said he wanted this album to encompass their entire sound, regardless of whether or not it would be their best. And I think that the goal was met and was surpassed, if reviews tell you anything.

Wasting Light was not only nominated for six Grammy Awards, but it took home five and wowed critics everywhere. Rolling Stone’s David Fricke and NME’s Rob Parker agree that it is easily the best Foo album since The Colour and the Shape in 1997. With the edgy opener, “Bridge Burning” and subsequent single “Rope” — which is only the second single to debut at #1 on Billboard’s Rock Songs — it’s hard not to get sucked in and as Parker put it, “drive just that little bit faster…”

And where do I stand? Personally, I think this is my favorite album from The Foo Fighters. It’s the kind of album that you don’t get to hear often anymore. It’s the kind of album the artists really poured everything into, just for rock n’ roll’s sake.

But let me know what you think. You can comment here, Facebook, or Twitter, and until next time, keep listening.

Honorable Song Mentions: Rope (I mean that cymbal though), White Limo, Arlandria, Miss The Misery, I Should Have Known

I really encourage you to check out Perker’s NME review here. I think it’s very well written and the guy really likes the album and it’s cool that there’s a critic out there that doens’t shy away from it.

The Rolling Stone article by David Fricke can be found here

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